I heart September

cut lavender, harvesting sickle and twine

I love autumn, September, the aroma of roasting chile, and the cooler weather.  I love the end of the harvest – for us it’s peaches and a last burst of lavender blossoms. I love the hum of the dehydrator, loaded with peaches and apples. I love the back to school/back to business vibe of this month. 

We’ve been trying to do as much homesteading as possible; harvesting on time, safeguarding the harvest for the months to come using our dehydrator and oversized freezer, and sharing that harvest with friends and neighbors.

What do you enjoy about September?

Fried sage, your new favorite delicacy

sage plant

Do you like freshly-fried bacon crushed onto your salad? Honey roasted walnuts? Well, I have a new one for you. A delicious, crunchy topping for salads, soups and whatever else you like. It’s fried sage. Yes, those lovely silvery leaves in your garden. Go get some scissors, cut some and meet me in the kitchen…

  • A handful of sage without stems
  • Olive oil to coat the frying pan
  • Salt to taste

  1. In a frying pan or nonstick pan, heat olive oil to medium high heat.
  2. Toss in the sage.
  3. When sage is crispy, transfer to a plate that has been lined with a paper towel.

Use sometime today as a topping. 

Chives in my yogurt

Yogurt in a glass with fresh chives

Even better than clouds in my coffee,  are chives in my yogurt!

Years ago in France, I discovered the delicious combination of fromage blanc (a sort of liquid farmer’s cheese) with fresh herbs.  At home in New Mexico, I’ve recreated this delicious appetizer with yogurt or kefir (a more liquid yogurt, that you can drink out of a glass) and chives cut fresh from the garden. I add a little sea salt, and it’s just delicious.

herb versus spice

What is an herb and what is a spice? The simple answer is that herbs are leafy; think parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, basil. Spices are roots, barks and seeds, like cinnamon, clove, and ginger.

la soupe à l’oseille

sorel

Have you ever had sorrel soup? In France and in other countries in Europe, sorrel is the harbinger of Spring. When your sorrel pops up out of the ground, Spring is here, and it’s time to make “la soupe à l’oseille” Here is the basic recipe: 

  1. In a frying pan, put some butter, olive oil, salt and diced shallot.
  2. Once the shallot is translucent, throw in a lot of freshly cut sorrel, then put a lid on the frying pan.
  3. When the sorrel is wilted and dark green, turn off the flame and set aside to cool for 20 minutes.
  4. Put the mixture into your blender, along with some heavy whipping cream or crème fraîche.
  5. Blend until smooth, then pour into bowls.
  6. Garnish with black pepper

For more crazy herb recipes, some even with exact measurements, visit http://corralesherbfarm.com

3 easy ways to add fresh herbs to your dinners this week

Fresh herbs always announce the beginning of Spring for us here at Corrales Herb Farm. We have chives, oregano, and lemon balm all coming up out of the warming earth. Today we’d like to give you three easy ways to add fresh herbs to your dinner table this week.

  • Add a sprig of fresh rosemary to a simple cheese platter. Add French bread and dinner is ready! 
  • Chop some fresh chives into your yogurt for a refreshing snack.
  • Canned or boxed tomato soup becomes a gourmet appetizer with fresh chopped basil. TIP: Use scissors to easily chop leafy herbs like basil.

Loving the lovage

Lovage plant

Our lovage plant that’s under our fig tree comes back every year, and we just saw the plant sprouting for 2019 yesterday. It will grow to this nice size, and we can use it in Virgin Bloody Mary’s, in stews and in gazpacho.

Corrales Herb Farm

Bienvenue chez nous ! Here at our little farm in New Mexico, we aim to provide friends, family, and local chefs with favorite and forgotten herbs. Chives on your yogurt, cream of sorrel soup, lovage in your beef stew, a lavender sachet on your dashboard.